International Cancer Imaging Society Development Site


Our Journal - Cancer Imaging

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Our Journal 1

 

Cancer Imaging is the official journal of ICIS, an open access, peer-reviewed journal published by BioMed Central. Original articles, as well as reviews and editorials written by international imaging experts with a subspecialty focus on oncology, are published regularly online;  sign up for alerts to keep up-to-date with the latest articles.

Cancer Imaging Impact factor is 2.404.

The journal encompasses CT, MRI, ultrasound, single photon and positron emission tomography, including multimodality imaging in all kinds of malignant tumours, plus new developments, techniques and innovations.

All articles published in Cancer Imaging are included in PubMed, the most widely used biomedical bibliographic database service, as well as Embase, EmCare, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, Science Citation Index and Scopus. The full text of all research articles is deposited in PubMed Central, the US National Library of Medicine's full-text repository of life science literature.

ICIS Members receive 20% discount on article-processing fees.

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Medical Imaging News -- ScienceDaily

Bringing high res magnetic resonance imaging to nanometer scale

Published: Wed, 21 Feb 2018 12:24:14 EST

A new technique that brings magnetic resonance imaging to the nanometer scale with unprecedented resolution will open the door for major advances in understanding new materials, virus particles and proteins that cause diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

Digital liver scanning technology could halve the number of liver biopsies needed in the NHS

Published: Thu, 15 Feb 2018 16:22:19 EST

A study has revealed that a new scanning technology could almost halve the number of liver biopsies carried out on people with fatty liver disease.

New method maps the dopamine system in Parkinson’s patients

Published: Tue, 13 Feb 2018 11:22:10 EST

With the aid of a PET camera, researchers have developed a new method for investigating the dopamine system in the brains of patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. The method measures levels of a protein called dopamine transporter and could lead to improved diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease and the development of new treatments.

Motion capture-like technology for tracking protein shape

Published: Tue, 13 Feb 2018 11:11:29 EST

Researchers have demonstrated a motion capture-like technology that tracks how proteins fold and change shape using fluorescent probes. The research could lead to improvements in drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases, as well as new methods of imaging that may also allow for earlier detection.

Kidney stones on the rise

Published: Tue, 13 Feb 2018 08:44:11 EST

Kidney stones are a painful health condition, often requiring multiple procedures at great discomfort to the patient. Growing evidence suggests that the incidence of kidney stones is increasing steadily, especially in women. Researchers investigated the rise in stone formers to determine if this is a new trend, or simply an improvement in the way kidney stones are detected.

Brain scans show why people get aggressive after a drink or two

Published: Mon, 12 Feb 2018 10:31:26 EST

Researchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that measure blood flow in the brain to better understand why people often become aggressive and violent after drinking alcohol. After only two drinks, the researchers noted changes in the working of the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part normally involved in tempering a person's levels of aggression.

NIR light may identify breast cancer patients who will benefit most from chemotherapy

Published: Mon, 12 Feb 2018 08:44:48 EST

A new optical imaging system uses red and near-infrared light to identify breast cancer patients who will respond to chemotherapy. The imaging system may be able to predict response to chemotherapy as early as two weeks after beginning treatment. Findings are from a first pilot study of the new imaging system -- a noninvasive method of measuring blood flow dynamics in response to a single breath hold.

Biomarker predicts success of Afib treatment

Published: Mon, 12 Feb 2018 08:44:43 EST

Researchers report successful use of heart imaging to predict the benefit or futility of catheter ablation, an increasingly popular way to treat atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder.

Eye could provide 'window to the brain' after stroke

Published: Thu, 08 Feb 2018 10:43:09 EST

Research into curious bright spots in the eyes on stroke patients' brain images could one day alter the way these individuals are assessed and treated. A team of scientists has found that a chemical routinely given to stroke patients undergoing brain scans can leak into their eyes, highlighting those areas and potentially providing insight into their strokes.

Zika brain damage may go undetected in pregnancy

Published: Tue, 06 Feb 2018 09:07:19 EST

Zika virus may cause significant damage to the fetal brain even when the baby's head size is normal, according to a primate study. The damage can be difficult to detect even with sophisticated brain scans. It may also occur from infections during childhood and adolescence. Hard hit are brain regions that generate new brain cells. Fetal brain structures that may be injured include those where neural stem cells play a role in learning and memory.

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29 January 2018

ECR 28th February to 4th March 2018

Come and visit us at ECR, pick up our 2018 annual teaching course brochure and find out about the charming town of Menton.

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