International Cancer Imaging Society


Our Journal - Cancer Imaging

Our Journal 1

We are pleased to announce that as from 1st January 2014 Cancer Imaging will be published by BioMed Central, thereby enhanced with the full benefits of open access.

Our Journal 1

As official journal of ICIS and with an impact factor of 1.59, Cancer Imaging is now an open access, peer-reviewed journal publishing original articles, as well as reviews and editorials written by international imaging experts with a subspecialty focus on oncology.

The journal encompasses CT, MRI, ultrasound, single photon and positron emission tomography, including multimodality imaging in all kinds of malignant tumours, plus new developments, techniques and innovations.

All articles published in Cancer Imaging are included in PubMed, the most widely used biomedical bibliographic database service, as well as Embase, EmCare, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, Science Citation Index and Scopus. The full text of all research articles is deposited in PubMed Central, the US National Library of Medicine's full-text repository of life science literature.

Submit your next manuscript to Cancer Imaging and take full advantage of the following:

Our Journal 3



Members Area

Medical Imaging News -- ScienceDaily

Information sharing between health systems reduces tests, study shows

Published: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:59:16 GMT

Researchers analyzed the care of patients who were seen emergently during a six month period in 2012. The results showed that 560 potentially duplicative diagnostic procedures, such as blood work and imaging, were avoided when the providers used the health information exchange tool. The study suggests that sharing clinical information with other health systems has the potential to generate greater efficiencies in emergency departments by eliminating duplicate diagnostic testing.

Want to quit smoking? New study says try 'self-expanding' activities

Published: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:55:36 GMT

If you are trying to quit smoking, one method to incorporate is to do new, exciting “self-expanding” activities that can help with nicotine craving. This is the take-home message from a new study. "Our study reveals for the first time using brain imaging that engaging in exciting or what we call 'self-expanding' activities, such as puzzle-solving, games, or hobbies with one's partner, appears to reduce craving for nicotine," said one researcher.

MRI, on a molecular scale: System could one day peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules

Published: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 20:14:35 GMT

A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that can produce nano-scale images, and may one day allow researchers to peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules, has been developed by researchers. For decades, scientists have used techniques like X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) to gain invaluable insight into the atomic structure of molecules, but such efforts have long been hampered by the fact that they demand large quantities of a specific molecule and often in ordered and crystalized form to be effective -- making it all but impossible to peer into the structure of most molecules.

Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution

Published: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:42:19 GMT

A major challenge of systems biology is understanding how phenomena at the cellular scale correlate with activity at the organism level. A concerted effort has been made especially in the brain, as scientists are aiming to clarify how neural activity is translated into consciousness and other complex brain activities. One example of the technologies needed is whole-brain imaging at single-cell resolution. This imaging normally involves preparing a highly transparent sample that minimizes light scattering and then imaging neurons tagged with fluorescent probes at different slices to produce a 3D representation.

Key milestone for brown fat research with ground-breaking MRI scan

Published: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 13:08:22 GMT

The first MRI scan to show 'brown fat' in a living adult could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity. Brown fat has become a hot topic for scientists due its ability to use energy and burn calories, helping to keep weight in check. Understanding the brown fat tissue and how it can be used to such ends is of growing interest in the search to help people suffering from obesity or at a high risk of developing diabetes.

World's first successful visualization of key coenzyme

Published: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 21:20:29 GMT

Japanese researchers have successfully developed the world's first imaging method for visualizing the behavior of nicotine-adenine dinucleotide derivative (NAD(P)H), a key coenzyme, inside cells. This feat could ultimately facilitate the diagnosis of cancer and liver dysfunction and help to elucidate the mechanisms of neurological disorders.

Beating the clock for ischemic stroke sufferers

Published: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 21:20:25 GMT

Researchers have developed a new computer tool to ensure faster care and treatment for stroke patients. The CAD stroke technology is capable of detecting signs of stroke from computed tomography (CT) scans. A CT scan uses X-rays to take pictures of the brain in slices. When blood flow to the brain is blocked, an area of the brain turns softer or decreases in density due to insufficient blood flow, pointing to an ischemic stroke.

Functional brain imaging reliably predicts which vegetative patients have potential to recover consciousness

Published: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 00:37:00 GMT

A functional brain imaging technique known as positron emission tomography is a promising tool for determining which severely brain damaged individuals in vegetative states have the potential to recover consciousness, according to new research.

Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults, study finds

Published: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 22:11:56 GMT

The size and shape of two brain regions involved in emotion and motivation may differ in young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week, according to a new study. The findings suggest that recreational marijuana use may lead to previously unidentified brain changes, and highlight the importance of research aimed at understanding the long-term effects of low to moderate marijuana use on the brain. 

MRI pinpoints region of brain injury in some concussion patients

Published: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 12:45:20 GMT

Researchers using information provided by a magnetic resonance imaging technique have identified regional white matter damage in the brains of people who experience chronic dizziness and other symptoms after concussion. The findings suggest that information provided by MRI can speed the onset of effective treatments for concussion patients.


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New Publisher from 1st January 2014

New Publisher from 1st January 2014

Published: Tue, 31 Dec 2013

We are pleased to announce that as from 1st January 2014 Cancer Imaging will ...

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