International Cancer Imaging Society


Our Journal - Cancer Imaging

Our Journal 1

We are pleased to announce that as from 1st January 2014 Cancer Imaging will be published by BioMed Central, thereby enhanced with the full benefits of open access.

Our Journal 1

As official journal of ICIS and with an impact factor of 1.59, Cancer Imaging is now an open access, peer-reviewed journal publishing original articles, as well as reviews and editorials written by international imaging experts with a subspecialty focus on oncology.

The journal encompasses CT, MRI, ultrasound, single photon and positron emission tomography, including multimodality imaging in all kinds of malignant tumours, plus new developments, techniques and innovations.

All articles published in Cancer Imaging are included in PubMed, the most widely used biomedical bibliographic database service, as well as Embase, EmCare, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, Science Citation Index and Scopus. The full text of all research articles is deposited in PubMed Central, the US National Library of Medicine's full-text repository of life science literature.

Submit your next manuscript to Cancer Imaging and take full advantage of the following:

Our Journal 3



Members Area

Medical Imaging News -- ScienceDaily

White-matter deficits in users of codeine-containing cough syrups

Published: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 22:39:44 GMT

An imaging study of chronic users of codeine-containing cough syrups (CCS) has found deficits in specific regions of brain white matter and associates these changes with increased impulsivity in codeine-containing cough syrup users. These findings were consistent with results of previous studies of heroin and cocaine addicts. White matter disruptions also correlated with the duration of CCS use.

New X-ray imaging lets researchers see 'live' the effectiveness of cystic fibrosis treatments

Published: Fri, 15 Aug 2014 23:25:30 GMT

Scientists have developed an X-ray imaging system that enables researchers to see 'live' how effective treatments are for cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis affects many of the body's systems, but most severely the lungs, and currently it can take several months to measure how effective treatment is for the early-fatal lung disease.

Double vision: New imaging agent improves surgeon's ability to find, remove cancer

Published: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 16:36:16 GMT

It’s a question that both cancer surgeons and patients ask after the removal of a malignant tumor – did the procedure “get” all of the cancer? Scientists have now engineered a hybrid imaging agent that maps out tumors before surgery, and causes cancer cells to glow during surgery – improving the surgeon’s ability to find and remove cancerous lesions while preserving healthy tissue.

New non-invasive technique controls size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier

Published: Thu, 14 Aug 2014 16:36:14 GMT

The size of molecules penetrating the blood-brain barrier can be controlled using acoustic pressure -— the pressure of an ultrasound beam -— to let specific molecules through, a new technique has demonstrated for the first time. This innovative method may help improve drug delivery to the brain. Most small -- and all large -- molecule drugs do not currently penetrate the blood-brain barrier that sits between the vascular bed and the brain tissue. "As a result," one researcher explains, "all central nervous system diseases remain undertreated at best."

Imaging system guides brain tumor removal to improve patient outcomes

Published: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 20:34:19 GMT

NIBIB-funded researchers have developed an imaging system that rapidly and accurately detects a molecular marker found in brain gliomas. It promises to improve the precision of these difficult surgeries by enabling the complete removal of the tumor, while reducing residual damage to brain tissue and neural function.

Prostate cancer diagnosis improves with MRI technology

Published: Tue, 12 Aug 2014 17:35:01 GMT

MRI technology has been melded with a traditional ultrasound prostate exam to create a three-dimensional map of the prostate that allows physicians to view growths that were previously undetectable. "With an ultrasound exam, we are typically unable to see the most suspicious areas of the prostate so we end up sampling different parts of the prostate that statistically speaking are more likely to have cancer," said one expert. "The MRI is a game-changer. It allows us to target the biopsy needles exactly where we think the cancer is located. It's more precise."

Robotic-assisted ultrasound imaging: From trans-Atlantic evaluation to help in day-to-day practice

Published: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 22:02:49 GMT

While in Germany a surgeon used a computer to perform a robot-assisted trans-Atlantic ultrasound examination on a person in Boston. In another study, a scientist showed how a cardiologist’s video e-consultation, coupled with a remote robot-assisted echocardiogram test, dramatically reduces the waiting time for a diagnosis faced by heart failure patients.

Medicinal oil reduces debilitating epileptic seizures associated with Glut1 deficiency, trial shows

Published: Mon, 11 Aug 2014 20:58:19 GMT

A rare metabolic disease that caused hundreds of seizures daily for a 6-year-old is now significantly under control as part of a clinical trial that uses a medicinal oil for treatment. Within hours, treatment with an edible oil dramatically reduced the number of seizures for then-4-year-old.

Pictures in five seconds: Digital x-ray imaging

Published: Fri, 08 Aug 2014 15:07:13 GMT

Wanting to replace the medical equipment for taking X-rays, experts in Mexico have created a system of digital x-ray imaging, which replaces the traditional plaque by a solid detector, which delivers results in five seconds. Analog equipment take six minutes to develop the traditional film.

Bone tumor destroyed using incisionless surgery: First in North American child

Published: Wed, 06 Aug 2014 18:21:26 GMT

A Canadian child is the first in North America to have undergone a specialized procedure that uses ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to destroy a tumor in his leg without piercing the skin. Doctors used an MRI to guide high-intensity ultrasound waves to destroy a benign bone tumor called osteoid osteoma. The lesion had caused 16-year-old Jack Campanile excruciating pain for a year prior to the procedure. By the time he went to bed that night, the athletic teen experienced complete pain relief.


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Radiologist Jelle Barentsz Knighted

Radiologist Jelle Barentsz Knighted

Published: Fri, 30 May 2014

Based on international and national recommendations and evaluation letters of ...

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