International Cancer Imaging Society


Our Journal - Cancer Imaging

Our Journal 1

We are pleased to announce that as from 1st January 2014 Cancer Imaging will be published by BioMed Central, thereby enhanced with the full benefits of open access.

Our Journal 1

As official journal of ICIS and with an impact factor of 1.59, Cancer Imaging is now an open access, peer-reviewed journal publishing original articles, as well as reviews and editorials written by international imaging experts with a subspecialty focus on oncology.

The journal encompasses CT, MRI, ultrasound, single photon and positron emission tomography, including multimodality imaging in all kinds of malignant tumours, plus new developments, techniques and innovations.

All articles published in Cancer Imaging are included in PubMed, the most widely used biomedical bibliographic database service, as well as Embase, EmCare, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, Science Citation Index and Scopus. The full text of all research articles is deposited in PubMed Central, the US National Library of Medicine's full-text repository of life science literature.

Submit your next manuscript to Cancer Imaging and take full advantage of the following:

Our Journal 3



Members Area

Medical Imaging News -- ScienceDaily

Novel technologies advance brain surgery to benefit patients

Published: Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:36:51 GMT

In a milestone procedure, neurosurgeons have integrated advanced 3-D imaging, computer simulation and next-generation surgical tools to perform a highly complex brain surgery through a small incision to remove deep-seated tumors. "These minimally invasive approaches permit smaller incisions and a shorter recovery. In this case, the patient was able to go home the day after the successful removal of multiple brain tumors," said one expert.

Forty-five percent rise in diagnostic imaging tests by GPs in Australia

Published: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 19:25:47 GMT

A 45 percent rise in diagnostic imaging tests ordered by Australian GPs is being driven by increasing GP visits, a rising number of problems managed at consultations and a higher likelihood that GPs order imaging tests for these problems, according to a new study says. Based on a long term national survey of 9,802 GPs between 2002 and 2012, the report draws on data from more than 980,000 GP-patient encounter records to assess the extent to which GP's order tests in line with diagnostic imaging guidelines.

Low strength brain stimulation may be effective for depression

Published: Tue, 22 Jul 2014 13:14:33 GMT

Brain stimulation treatments, like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are often effective for the treatment of depression. Like antidepressant medications, however, they typically have a delayed onset. For example, a patient may receive several weeks of regular ECT treatments before a full response is achieved. Thus, there is an impetus to develop antidepressant treatments that act to rapidly improve mood. Low field magnetic stimulation (LFMS) is one such potential new treatment with rapid mood-elevating effects, report scientists.

Even mild traumatic brain injury may cause brain damage

Published: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 20:52:02 GMT

Even mild traumatic brain injury may cause brain damage and thinking and memory problems, according to a study. Compared to people with no brain injury, those with injuries had brain damage in brain white matter consisting of disruption to nerve axons, those parts of nerve cells that make up white matter and that allow brain cells to transmit messages to each other, a study shows.

Abdominal aortic aneurysms: Surgeon explains who needs screening, treatment

Published: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 15:22:48 GMT

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a potentially life-threatening condition: If the body’s major blood vessel ruptures, it can prove deadly. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recently updated its recommendations on screening. Now a surgeon explains who should be watched for abdominal aortic aneurysms, how they are diagnosed and how surgery, which now includes a less invasive endovascular option, is improving survival rates.

Breast cancer: Disease management program is largely consistent with guidelines

Published: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 13:58:29 GMT

There are only few discrepancies between the disease management program for breast cancer and current guidelines. However, some of the guidelines are more detailed. A need for revision may arise if new studies provide new evidence on a disease and its treatment.

Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis

Published: Wed, 16 Jul 2014 13:07:32 GMT

A new self-assembling nanoparticle has been developed that targets tumors, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier. The new nanoparticle boosts the effectiveness of MRI scanning by specifically seeking out receptors that are found in cancerous cells. The nanoparticle is coated with a special protein that looks for specific signals given off by tumors. When it finds one, it begins to interact with the cancerous cells; this interaction strips off the protein coating, causing the nanoparticle to self-assemble into a much larger particle so that it is more visible on the scan.

Fish oil supplements reduce incidence of cognitive decline, may improve memory function

Published: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 18:28:45 GMT

Regular use of fish oil supplements (FOS) was associated with a significant reduction in cognitive decline and brain atrophy in older adults, a study has found. The study examined the relationship between FOS use during the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and indicators of cognitive decline.

Researchers assess emergency radiology response after Boston Marathon bombings

Published: Tue, 15 Jul 2014 12:52:31 GMT

An after-action review of one hospital's emergency radiology response to the Boston Marathon bombings highlights the crucial role medical imaging plays in emergency situations and ways in which radiology departments can improve their preparedness for mass casualty events.

Smell and eye tests show potential to detect Alzheimer's early

Published: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 19:55:12 GMT

A decreased ability to identify odors might indicate the development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while examinations of the eye could indicate the build-up of beta-amyloid, a protein associated with Alzheimer's, in the brain, according to the results of four new research trials.


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Radiologist Jelle Barentsz Knighted

Radiologist Jelle Barentsz Knighted

Published: Fri, 30 May 2014

Based on international and national recommendations and evaluation letters of ...

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