International Cancer Imaging Society Development Site

International Cancer Imaging Society Meeting and 18th Annual Teaching Course

  Advancing Cancer Imaging:   

  Improving Patient Outcomes  

Sun 07 Oct 2018 - Tue 09 Oct 2018

Palais de l’Europe, Menton, France

Meeting President: Prof. Wim Oyen, London, UK

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Interactive Workshops

These one day teaching courses are limited to 20 participants, each with their own imaging workstation and content delivered through lectures and hands-on case based learning.

Courses in 2018

Masterclass in Imaging of Gynaecological Cancer, London, Thu 01 Nov

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Other Courses in 2018

Masterclass in Imaging of Oncological Whole Body MRI, London, Thu 08 Nov

If you would like to be kept updated about our courses please scroll down and register your interest in the turquoise box at the bottom of the homepage.

Join our Society

Do you believe that Cancer Imaging is important?

If your answer is yes, join us to support and promote the education in oncological imaging and stimulate research in the study of human tumour behaviour.

As a member you will also receive:

  • Discounted registration fees for all our teaching courses
  • Exclusive access to the members' area
  • Exclusive access to posters and presentations from the annual teaching course
  • 20% off the APC for submitting manuscripts to Cancer Imaging

» Join now 

About ICIS

The International Cancer Imaging Society exists to meet the important challenges of advancing imaging in the multidisciplinary management of cancer.

We promote education in oncological imaging and stimulate research in the study of human tumour behaviour, bringing together radiologists with an interest in oncological imaging for the exchange of ideas, and to organise scientific meetings, multicentre research studies and postgraduate courses within the field.

 

» Latest News 

Cancer Imaging Journal

Impact Factor 3.016

Cancer Imaging is the official journal of ICIS, it is an open access, peer-reviewed journal with original articles as well as reviews and editorials.  The journal encompasses CT, MRI, ultrasound, single photon and positron emission tomography, including multimodality imaging in all kinds of malignant tumours, plus new developments, techniques and innovations.

A really enjoyable, informative and fun three days in a beautiful town.

KP | Royal Surrey Hospital, Guildford, UK

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Please click on the link below to register your interest for future ICIS interactive courses.  We will notify you in advance of registration opening, allowing you first refusal on our popular courses.

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Medical Imaging News -- ScienceDaily

CT scans may increase risk of brain cancer, study suggests

Published: Thu, 19 Jul 2018 08:53:37 EDT

A new study suggests that CT scans, commonly used in medical imaging, may increase the risk of brain tumors.

The rise of secondary imaging interpretations

Published: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 14:25:29 EDT

Among Medicare beneficiaries, the frequency of billed secondary interpretation services for diagnostic imaging services increased from 2003 to 2016 across a broad range of modalities and body regions, often dramatically.

Brain iron levels may predict multiple sclerosis disabilities

Published: Tue, 17 Jul 2018 10:12:53 EDT

A new, highly accurate MRI technique can monitor iron levels in the brains of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and help identify those at a higher risk for developing physical disability, according to a new study.

Breast cancer follow-up imaging varies widely, study finds

Published: Mon, 16 Jul 2018 16:45:17 EDT

Follow-up imaging for women with non-metastatic breast cancer varies widely across the country, according to a new study. Some patients go without the annual mammograms that experts recommend, while others with the same cancer diagnosis receive full-body scans that expose them to significant amounts of radiation and are not recommended by experts.

Test for Alzheimer's disease directly measures synaptic loss

Published: Mon, 16 Jul 2018 15:16:00 EDT

Researchers have tested a new method for directly measuring synaptic loss in individuals with Alzheimer's disease. The method, which uses PET imaging technology to scan for a specific protein in the brain linked to synapses, has the potential to accelerate research for new Alzheimer's treatments, the researchers said.

How fast can acute stroke treatment become to still be reliable?

Published: Fri, 13 Jul 2018 09:35:53 EDT

Every day roughly three new stroke suspects are rushed by ambulance to Helsinki University Hospital Emergency Department to be considered for urgent clot-busting thrombolytic therapy or thrombectomy to prevent permanent stroke caused by acute cerebral ischemia. But perilously, out of one hundred such 'thrombolysis candidates' only half is actually caused by this condition and the rest have other kinds of diagnoses. Despite the tremendous time-pressure, the rapid diagnoses need to be accurate.

Researchers trace Parkinson's damage in the heart

Published: Fri, 13 Jul 2018 09:35:26 EDT

A new way to examine stress and inflammation in the heart will help Parkinson's researchers test new therapies and explore an unappreciated way the disease puts people at risk of falls and hospitalization.

Imaging technique illuminates immune status of monkeys with HIV-like virus

Published: Thu, 12 Jul 2018 11:44:50 EDT

Findings from an animal study suggest that a non-invasive imaging technique could, with further development, become a tool to assess immune system recovery in people receiving treatment for HIV infection. Researchers used single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and a CD4-specific imaging probe to assess immune system changes throughout the bodies of macaques infected with SIV following initiation and interruption of antiretroviral therapy (ART). They evaluated pools of CD4+ T cells in tissues.

Engineered cancer cells can fight primary and metastatic cancer

Published: Wed, 11 Jul 2018 14:14:04 EDT

A new study leverages the power of gene editing, capitalizing on cancer cells' self-homing ability to take a critical step toward using cancer cells to kill cancer.

Unique brain 'fingerprint' can predict drug effectiveness

Published: Tue, 10 Jul 2018 12:28:13 EDT

Personalized medicine -- delivering therapies specially tailored to a patient's unique physiology -- has been a goal of researchers and doctors for a long time. New research provides a way of delivering personalized treatments to patients with neurological disease.

Every person has a unique brain anatomy

Published: Tue, 10 Jul 2018 10:46:31 EDT

Like with fingerprints, no two people have the same brain anatomy, a study has shown. This uniqueness is the result of a combination of genetic factors and individual life experiences.

New patch boosts brightness in medical diagnostic tests

Published: Mon, 09 Jul 2018 13:27:09 EDT

A multidisciplinary team has developed a high-tech fix that brings some medical diagnostic tests out of the dark and into the light.

Simple test to predict rare cancers' likely spread

Published: Mon, 09 Jul 2018 10:12:13 EDT

Circulating tumor cell clusters in the blood of head and neck patients with locally and regionally advanced cancer have been found to be strongly associated with distant metastases within six months.

Blood flow in the heart revealed in a flash

Published: Mon, 09 Jul 2018 10:00:00 EDT

Researchers have for the first time been able to use information from computer tomography images to simulate the heart function of an individual patient. Some of the modeling methods they use have been developed in the motor industry.

Pathway of Alzheimer's degeneration discovered

Published: Thu, 05 Jul 2018 11:00:45 EDT

Scientists have used a unique approach to track brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease, uncovering a pathway through which degeneration spreads from one region to another.

A first look at interstitial fluid flow in the brain

Published: Tue, 03 Jul 2018 14:14:33 EDT

Past research has shown a link between interstitial fluid flow and an increased invasion rate of glioblastoma cells, and biomedical researchers and electrical engineers recently developed a new method to measure and reconstruct interstitial fluid flow velocities in the brain. This method gives a first look at interstitial fluid flow dynamics in glioma models, and the technique can readily translate to clinical models already using contrast-enhanced MRI.

Cardiac hybrid imaging an effective tool for predicting heart attacks

Published: Tue, 03 Jul 2018 11:00:32 EDT

Cardiac hybrid imaging with CT and nuclear stress testing is an excellent long-term predictor of adverse cardiac events like heart attacks in patients being evaluated for coronary artery disease, according to a new study.

Sound waves could provide 'liquid biopsies'

Published: Tue, 03 Jul 2018 08:41:24 EDT

Using sound waves, researchers have developed a gentle, contact-free method for separating circulating tumor cells from blood samples that is fast and efficient enough for clinical use. The ability to quickly and efficiently harvest and grow these cells from a blood sample would enable 'liquid biopsies' capable of providing individualized diagnosis, prognosis and suggestions for treatment strategies.

Versatile ultrasound system could transform how doctors use medical imaging

Published: Mon, 02 Jul 2018 13:00:33 EDT

A new ultrasound system that uses optical, instead of electronic components, could improve performance while giving doctors significantly more flexibility in how they use ultrasound to diagnose and treat medical problems.

Beer. Soup. Barley's next great use? A medical imaging drink

Published: Wed, 27 Jun 2018 16:02:35 EDT

Roasted barley, when struck by a common laser beam, can illuminate the throat and the gastrointestinal track. The discovery could improve our ability to diagnose swallowing disorders, which affect more than 15 million Americans, as well as gut disorders. What's more, because many human diets already include barley, it could be fast-tracked for medical use.