International Cancer Imaging Society

International Cancer Imaging Society Meeting and 18th Annual Teaching Course

  Advancing Cancer Imaging:   

  Improving Patient Outcomes  

Sun 07 Oct 2018 - Tue 09 Oct 2018

Palais de l’Europe, Menton, France

Meeting President: Prof. Wim Oyen, London, UK

In Collaboration with the International Workshop in Lymphoma and Myeloma:

DRG

Supported by: The French Society of Radiology

Interactive Workshops

Courses in 2018

Masterclass in Imaging of :     

Thoracic Neoplasms, London in May

Whole Body Diffusion, London, date TBC

Hepatobiliary Tumours, venue and date TBC

If you would like to be kept updated about our courses please scroll down and register your interest in the turquoise box at the bottom of the homepage.

Cancer Imaging Journal

Impact Factor 2.404

Cancer Imaging is the official journal of ICIS, it is an open access, peer-reviewed journal with original articles as well as reviews and editorials.  The journal encompasses CT, MRI, ultrasound, single photon and positron emission tomography, including multimodality imaging in all kinds of malignant tumours, plus new developments, techniques and innovations.

About ICIS

The International Cancer Imaging Society exists to meet the important challenges of advancing imaging in the multidisciplinary management of cancer.

We promote education in oncological imaging and stimulate research in the study of human tumour behaviour, bringing together radiologists with an interest in oncological imaging for the exchange of ideas, and to organise scientific meetings, multicentre research studies and postgraduate courses within the field.

 

» Latest News 

Join our Society

Do you believe that Cancer Imaging is important?

If your answer is yes, join us to support and promote the education in oncological imaging and stimulate research in the study of human tumour behaviour.

As a member you will also receive:

  • Discounted registration fees for all our teaching courses
  • Exclusive access to the members' area
  • Exclusive access to posters and presentations from the annual teaching course
  • 20% off the APC for submitting manuscripts to Cancer Imaging

» Join now 

Congratulations to our 2017 prize winners!
07 October 2017

Congratulations to our 2017 prize winners!

ICIS Gold Medal 2017

We are delighted that Prof. Anwar Padhani from Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Cancer Centre in the UK has received this prestigious award. Please click here  to read more about Prof. Padhani.

Oral Presentation Winners

» Read more

Excellent course. Well informed faculty with good selection of cases and thorough course book.

AL | Herts, UK

Register your interest for all ICIS courses

Please click on the link below to register your interest for future ICIS interactive courses.  We will notify you in advance of registration opening, allowing you first refusal on this popular range of courses.

To register your interest, fill in the details below and click on the "Register Interest" button.




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Medical Imaging News -- ScienceDaily

Deadly heart rhythm halted by noninvasive radiation therapy

Published: Thu, 14 Dec 2017 10:17:57 EST

Radiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors have shown that radiation therapy -- aimed directly at the heart -- can be used to treat patients with a life-threatening heart rhythm. They treated five patients with irregular heart rhythms, called ventricular tachycardia, who had not responded to standard treatments. The therapy resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of ventricular tachycardia episodes.

Stuttering: Stop signals in the brain disturb speech flow

Published: Tue, 12 Dec 2017 12:54:26 EST

'G-g-g-g-g-ood morning' is a daily obstacle for people who stutter. However, so far, not much is known about the causes of persistent developmental stuttering, which is the most frequent speech disorder. Scientists have recently discovered that a hyperactive network in the right frontal part of the brain plays a crucial role in this deficit. It inhibits speech movement planning and execution, thereby interrupting the flow of speech.

Cancer imaging aid developed from horse chestnuts

Published: Tue, 12 Dec 2017 12:47:22 EST

Cancer imaging can be simplified by a photonic process utilizing molecules derived from horse chestnuts, research shows.

Faster, more accurate cancer detection using nanoparticles

Published: Tue, 12 Dec 2017 11:29:43 EST

Using light-emitting nanoparticles, scientists have invented a highly effective method to detect tiny tumors and track their spread, potentially leading to earlier cancer detection and more precise treatment. The technology could improve patient cure rates and survival times.

Presurgical imaging may predict whether epilepsy surgery will work

Published: Mon, 11 Dec 2017 14:08:57 EST

A statistical approach to combining presurgical PET scans and functional MRI of the brain may help predict which patients with drug-resistant epilepsy are most likely to benefit from surgery.

Chemists develop novel Washington Red dye for bio-imaging

Published: Mon, 11 Dec 2017 10:51:53 EST

Scientists have created an injectable dye that illuminates molecules with near infrared light, making it easier to see what is going on deep inside the body. The new dye will help medical researchers track the progression of a wide array of diseases, such as cancer.

Molecular beacon signals low oxygen with ultrasound

Published: Fri, 08 Dec 2017 11:35:42 EST

Areas of hypoxia, or low oxygen in tissue, are hallmarks of fast-growing cancers and of blockages or narrowing in blood vessels, such as stroke or peripheral artery disease. Researchers have developed a way to find hypoxic spots noninvasively in real time. The researchers developed an oxygen-sensitive molecular beacon that emits ultrasound signals in response to light, a process called photoacoustic imaging.

Deep insight into the heart

Published: Fri, 08 Dec 2017 09:55:26 EST

A new article outlines how modern non-invasive examinations using state-of-the-art imaging technology can reduce the risk of not-detecting infections of the heart muscle possibly leading to chronic inflammations and sudden death.

Including diagnosis related costs, 3-D mammography costs less than digital mammography

Published: Fri, 08 Dec 2017 08:53:23 EST

Although digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), or 3-D mammography, costs more than a digital mammography (DM) screening, it actually may help rein in cancer screening costs, according to preliminary findings.

New assay may help predict which pancreatic lesions may become cancerous

Published: Fri, 08 Dec 2017 08:53:16 EST

A new report describes a new simple molecular test to detect chromosomal abnormalities -- biomarkers known as telomere fusions -- in pancreatic tumor specimens and pancreatic cyst fluids. This assay may help predict the presence of high-grade or invasive pancreatic cancers requiring surgical intervention.

Solar eclipse: Using adaptive optics to understand eye damage

Published: Thu, 07 Dec 2017 14:17:37 EST

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers are using adaptive optics (AO) to analyze retinal eye damage from the August solar eclipse on a cellular level. The research could help doctors develop a deeper understanding of this rare condition, called solar retinopathy, which has no currently accepted treatment.

Contrast-enhanced digital mammography comparable to breast MRI after therapy or chemo

Published: Wed, 06 Dec 2017 19:37:59 EST

Contrast-enhanced digital mammography is comparable to breast MRI in evaluating residual breast cancer after neoadjuvant endocrine therapy or chemotherapy, according to new results.

PET tracer gauges effectiveness of promising Alzheimer's treatment

Published: Wed, 06 Dec 2017 12:24:43 EST

Researchers report on the first large-scale longitudinal imaging study to evaluate BACE1 inhibition with micro-PET in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. PET imaging has been established as an excellent identifier of the amyloid plaque and tau tangles that characterize Alzheimer's disease. Now it is proving to be an effective way to gauge treatment effectiveness.

New process could be key to understanding complex rearrangements in genome

Published: Tue, 05 Dec 2017 11:59:54 EST

Biologists have successfully harnessed new technology to develop an approach that could allow for rapid and precise identification of the CGRs involved in disease, cancer and disorder development, which is critical for diagnosis and treatment.

Microscope using UV instead of visible light emerging as diagnostic tool

Published: Mon, 04 Dec 2017 16:23:48 EST

New MUSE technology obtains high-resolution images of fresh biopsies for analysis within minutes, eliminating need for conventional slides and preserving original tissue sample.

PET identifies which prostate cancer patients can benefit from salvage radiation treatment

Published: Mon, 04 Dec 2017 16:23:45 EST

For prostate cancer patients who have rising levels of PSA (a cancer indicator) even after radical prostatectomy, early treatment makes a difference. In a study featured in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Australian researchers demonstrate that PET scans can identify which of these prostate cancer patients would benefit from salvage radiation treatment (SRT).

Ultrasound imaging needle to transform heart surgery

Published: Fri, 01 Dec 2017 09:10:00 EST

Heart tissue can be imaged in real-time during keyhole procedures using a new optical ultrasound needle. The revolutionary technology has been successfully used for minimally invasive heart surgery in pigs, giving an unprecedented, high-resolution view of soft tissues up to 2.5 cm in front of the instrument, inside the body.

Neutrophil-inspired propulsion

Published: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 13:38:15 EST

Inspired by white blood cells rolling on endovascular walls before transmigrating to the disease site, scientists have succeeded in getting particles to move along the walls of microscopic, three-dimensional vessels. This method could be used in targeted cancer therapeutics.

Visible signals from brain and heart

Published: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 11:23:58 EST

Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. Scientists have now developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualize calcium in living animals with the help of a radiation-free imaging technique known as optoacoustics. The method does not require the cells to be genetically modified and involves no radiation exposure.

Emergency radiologists see inner toll of opioid use disorders

Published: Thu, 30 Nov 2017 09:00:47 EST

Emergency radiologists are seeing a high prevalence of patients with complications related to opioid use disorders, according to results from a 12-year study. Researchers said the findings underscore the need for radiologists to play a role in the care continuum for these patients.