International Cancer Imaging Society


Welcome !

Message from the President

"Welcome to the International Cancer Imaging Society (ICIS), a professional body established to promote education and stimulate research in oncological imaging. ICIS promotes the exchange of ideas among radiologists and other physicians who specialize in cancer imaging. We hold our annual meetings at various locations in Europe, and satellite meetings are periodically conducted abroad in conjunction with national societies; past venues have included Hong Kong, South Africa, Kuwait, Hungary, Brazil and in October 2013, Korea. In February 2013 we held our inaugural one day, personalised, interactive teaching course in London, Masterclass in Imaging of Gynaecological Cancers. This was a great success, we held a repeat in September 2013 and the course is now being held in Paris on 3rd July 2014. Registration is open, places are limited so use the button in the right hand panel to register now! In addition the ICIS Interactive series has been developed to include a Masterclass in Imaging of Pancreatic Tumours, held for the first time in London in February 2014; we are planning to repeat this course later in 2014 - watch the website for further details!

The 14th ICIS Annual Teaching Course will be held in Heidelberg, Germany from October 9 to 11, 2014. Entitled "Working Together for the Patient", the meeting will be in association with the European Society of Oncologic Imaging (ESOI) and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) - do join us if you can!

I invite you to JOIN ICIS and become a Society member. You will benefit from reduced registration fees at all ICIS meetings, receive e-newsletters to keep you informed of Society news and highlighting recently published articles in our official journal CANCER IMAGING. Your membership and participation in the Society will help to further invigorate this exciting field of clinical practice and research."
 

 

Next Society meeting

International Cancer Imaging Society Meeting and 14th Annual Teaching Course

Thu 09 Oct 2014 Sat 11 Oct 2014 Society

International Cancer Imaging Society Meeting and 14th Annual Teaching Course

Heidelberg, Germany

Working together for the patient

In association with ESOI · European Society of Oncologic Imaging and EANM · European Association of Nuclear Medicine

Highlighting the role of imaging in the multidisciplinary management of oncology patients through:

  • Practical problem solving
  • Interactive teaching and active learning
  • State-of-the-art imaging strategies for clinical decision-making
  • Understanding cancer biology principles for practical imaging
  • Presentation of innovative research

A full flyer for this Meeting can be found here

Registration and full programme is available now.

 

» More Meetings
 

News

New Publisher from 1st January 2014

31 December 2013

New Publisher from 1st January 2014

We are pleased to announce that as from 1st January 2014 Cancer Imaging will be published by BioMed Central, thereby enhanced with the ful ...

» Read more » Other news items
 

ICIS Current and Past Office Bearers

Prof. Andrea Rockall
Prof. Andrea Rockall - Vice President
Dr. Beth McCarville
Dr. Beth McCarville - President Elect
Dr. Jay Heiken
Dr. Jay Heiken - Secretary
Dr. Dow-Mu Koh
Dr. Dow-Mu Koh - Treasurer
Dr. Leslie Quint
Dr. Leslie Quint - Immediate Past President
Prof. Anwar Padhani
Prof. Anwar Padhani - Past President
Prof. Vincent Chong
Prof. Vincent Chong - Past President
Dr. Liliane Ollivier
Dr. Liliane Ollivier - Past President
Professor Wolfgang Schima
Professor Wolfgang Schima - Past President
Prof. Robert Hermans
Prof. Robert Hermans - Past President
Dr. Sheila Rankin
Dr. Sheila Rankin - Past President
Prof. Jelle Barentsz
Prof. Jelle Barentsz - Past President
Prof. Massimo Bellomi
Prof. Massimo Bellomi - Past President
Prof. Daniel Vanel
Prof. Daniel Vanel - Past President
Prof. Rodney Reznek
Prof. Rodney Reznek - Past President
Prof. Dame Janet Husband DBE
Prof. Dame Janet Husband DBE - Past President
Prof. Rodney Hicks
Prof. Rodney Hicks - Editor-in-Chief, Cancer Imaging
Ken Miles
Ken Miles - Editor-in-Chief, Cancer Imaging
Dr. Conor Collins
Dr. Conor Collins - Past Honorary Secretary
Prof. Dr. med Stefan Diederich
Prof. Dr. med Stefan Diederich - Past Honorary Secretary
Dr. Michael King
Dr. Michael King - Past Honorary Treasurer
Maureen Watts
Maureen Watts - General Manager


» Full list of ICIS Fellows


ICIS 2014 - Heidelberg
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS!

Submission deadline:

23rd May 2014

Submit Abstract


ICIS Interactive Series

Masterclass in Imaging of Gynaecological Cancers - Clichy, Paris
Thurs 3rd July 2014

REGISTER NOW! 




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Medical Imaging News -- ScienceDaily

CT measures potentially dangerous arterial plaque in diabetic patients

Published: Tue, 22 Apr 2014 12:49:24 GMT

Imaging of the coronary arteries with computed tomography angiography provides an accurate assessment of arterial plaque and could have a dramatic impact on the management of diabetic patients who face a high risk of heart attacks and other cardiovascular events, according to a new multicenter study.

Information sharing between health systems reduces tests, study shows

Published: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:59:16 GMT

Researchers analyzed the care of patients who were seen emergently during a six month period in 2012. The results showed that 560 potentially duplicative diagnostic procedures, such as blood work and imaging, were avoided when the providers used the health information exchange tool. The study suggests that sharing clinical information with other health systems has the potential to generate greater efficiencies in emergency departments by eliminating duplicate diagnostic testing.

Want to quit smoking? New study says try 'self-expanding' activities

Published: Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:55:36 GMT

If you are trying to quit smoking, one method to incorporate is to do new, exciting “self-expanding” activities that can help with nicotine craving. This is the take-home message from a new study. "Our study reveals for the first time using brain imaging that engaging in exciting or what we call 'self-expanding' activities, such as puzzle-solving, games, or hobbies with one's partner, appears to reduce craving for nicotine," said one researcher.

MRI, on a molecular scale: System could one day peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules

Published: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 20:14:35 GMT

A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that can produce nano-scale images, and may one day allow researchers to peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules, has been developed by researchers. For decades, scientists have used techniques like X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMR) to gain invaluable insight into the atomic structure of molecules, but such efforts have long been hampered by the fact that they demand large quantities of a specific molecule and often in ordered and crystalized form to be effective -- making it all but impossible to peer into the structure of most molecules.

Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution

Published: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 16:42:19 GMT

A major challenge of systems biology is understanding how phenomena at the cellular scale correlate with activity at the organism level. A concerted effort has been made especially in the brain, as scientists are aiming to clarify how neural activity is translated into consciousness and other complex brain activities. One example of the technologies needed is whole-brain imaging at single-cell resolution. This imaging normally involves preparing a highly transparent sample that minimizes light scattering and then imaging neurons tagged with fluorescent probes at different slices to produce a 3D representation.

Key milestone for brown fat research with ground-breaking MRI scan

Published: Thu, 17 Apr 2014 13:08:22 GMT

The first MRI scan to show 'brown fat' in a living adult could prove to be an essential step towards a new wave of therapies to aid the fight against diabetes and obesity. Brown fat has become a hot topic for scientists due its ability to use energy and burn calories, helping to keep weight in check. Understanding the brown fat tissue and how it can be used to such ends is of growing interest in the search to help people suffering from obesity or at a high risk of developing diabetes.

World's first successful visualization of key coenzyme

Published: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 21:20:29 GMT

Japanese researchers have successfully developed the world's first imaging method for visualizing the behavior of nicotine-adenine dinucleotide derivative (NAD(P)H), a key coenzyme, inside cells. This feat could ultimately facilitate the diagnosis of cancer and liver dysfunction and help to elucidate the mechanisms of neurological disorders.

Beating the clock for ischemic stroke sufferers

Published: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 21:20:25 GMT

Researchers have developed a new computer tool to ensure faster care and treatment for stroke patients. The CAD stroke technology is capable of detecting signs of stroke from computed tomography (CT) scans. A CT scan uses X-rays to take pictures of the brain in slices. When blood flow to the brain is blocked, an area of the brain turns softer or decreases in density due to insufficient blood flow, pointing to an ischemic stroke.

Functional brain imaging reliably predicts which vegetative patients have potential to recover consciousness

Published: Wed, 16 Apr 2014 00:37:00 GMT

A functional brain imaging technique known as positron emission tomography is a promising tool for determining which severely brain damaged individuals in vegetative states have the potential to recover consciousness, according to new research.

Brain changes associated with casual marijuana use in young adults, study finds

Published: Tue, 15 Apr 2014 22:11:56 GMT

The size and shape of two brain regions involved in emotion and motivation may differ in young adults who smoke marijuana at least once a week, according to a new study. The findings suggest that recreational marijuana use may lead to previously unidentified brain changes, and highlight the importance of research aimed at understanding the long-term effects of low to moderate marijuana use on the brain. 


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